Hump Day Hot Seat: Andi Green

In today’s .stART here. Hump Day Hot Seat is Fresh Friday Finds alum Andi Green. Get to know Green and The WorryWoo Monsters a little better as she answers the questions provided by Finch & Ada. Enjoy!image

WorryBug and Wince, watercolor. Image courtesy of Andi Green.

1. Who Are You?

Andi Green

2. What do you do?

I write, illustrate and produce The WorryWoo Monsters series.

3. When/Where/How did you get your start? 

The WoryWoos came from characters I started sketching in high school, but it wasn’t until 2001 when I really got my start. I was working full time as a creative director and was invited to exhibit work at an art exhibit on the Lower East Side. I created a series of light boxes, called The Monsters in My Head, featuring individual characters dedicated to emotions. The show garnered such positive reactions that I was compelled to leave my full time job and start my own company just a few years later. Since then, I have gone on to publish six books and create six accompanying characters called the WorryWoo Monsters through my company named after the exhibit – Monsters In My Head.

4. How long have you been at it?

My whole life, but I’ve made it my full time gig for the past 4 years.

5. What is the most important thing we should know about you? 

I’m a bird loving, dog snuggling, cat cuddling, monster maker.

6. Is there anyone else in your field that you particularly admire?

Some may say not directly in my field, but I am a huge fan of Jhonen Vsquez, the comic book illustrator and creator of Invader Zim. His art is magnificent. In the children’s book world, I have always held Shel Silverstein, Richard Scarry and Maurice Sendak as truly inspiring authors/illustrators. Their work spoke to me as a child and still does today.

 7. What other types of art are you in to? 

The world of typography and design is probably my favorite art. Design has been a big part of my life since I was a teen, turning the pages of Ray Gun magazine, and reading comic books. It is design as an art that inspired me to become who I am today. Although the design world has taken a turn since the digital age, I won’t forget how it all started. I still get weak in the knees when I see work from Barbara Kruger, David Carson or Max Ernst. And Dada was an amazing period of art with no limits – put me in from of a Duchamp piece and I feel content for weeks. 🙂

8. You got any crazy hobbies or unique talents? 

I love adventure travelling. To give you an idea, I went on a trip to Antarctica last year… it was amazing.

9. What’s your favorite vice? 

Watching science fiction movies.

10. How do you make it over the creative hump? 

I put on my favorite loud music and I run. Usually that resets my mind.

 11. You eat food? What kind? Like to cook? 

Yes, I love to eat. I am a vegetarian and my favorite food is Mexican – salsa is my downfall. I love to cook, but I can’t bake – never works for me.

12. Truth or Dare? Elaborate. 

Dare. Most of the time I will do random things if challenged. Last year, I went ice climbing because I was told that I couldn’t handle it. It was a challenge to say the least.

13. What is your most prized possession?

A necklace with my dog’s name. I never take it off. My dog changed my life and whenever we are not together, I feel better having the necklace on. It is my way of knowing I am always connected to her. She is everything to me.

Hump Day Hot Seat: Allison Green

Allison Green‘s “Entwined” was the first Sunday Funday feature right here on .stARThere. Now, Green is in the Hump Day Hot Seat where you can learn more about the artist as she answers questions provided by Finch & Ada.

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Photo courtesy of Allison Green

1. Who are you?

Jersey City based artist Allison Green

2. What do you do?

 I create large scale, colorful oil paintings. Nature is most often my muse, and anthropomorphic trees and plant life have been my most recent subjects. I work full-time in my Jersey City studio.

3. When/Where/How did you get your start?

I studied art at the University of Maryland, where painting was my concentration, and I also studied in Florence, Italy at Studio Art Centers International (SACI). After college, I moved to the New York City area where I have worked ever since. For eight years, I taught art at a Jersey City Public School, which was both a rewarding and eye opening experience. As my work became more recognized, I decided to take the plunge and work as a full-time artist. Soon after, Susan Eley featured my first solo show at her gallery, Susan Eley Fine Art, in 2011. She now represents my work.

4. How long have you been at it?

I’ve been drawing and painting for as long as I can remember. As a child, I would always carry around a sketchbook. I started painting with Mr. Falcone, my 9th grade art teacher in my small hometown of Media, Pennsylvania. I remember that our first art class assignment was a home painting of something we were inspired by after a class trip to the Philadelphia Art Museum. I stayed up all night painting on this giant wooden board with house paints from the hardware store. I arrived to school the next day with a 4’X4′ painting! From then on, I was obsessed!

5. What is the most important thing we should know about you?

I never give up.

6. Is there anyone else in your field that you particularly admire?

So many – Anselm Kiefer, Kiki Smith, William Kentridge, Inka Essenhigh. In November, I saw a great show at Leila Heller Gallery by two painters who work together under the moniker Kate Eric.

7. What other types of art are you into?

I love the arts – film, dance, & theater. I always have music on when I am painting. Sometimes, I am dancing when I paint. I love it all as other art forms truly inspire me.

8. You got any crazy hobbies or unique talents?

My sister says that I am a great “animal photographer.” I am also really good at sleeping late and sleeping for very long periods of time.

9. What’s your favorite vice?

Red wine – could there be anything else? 🙂

10. How do you make it over the creative hump?

1. Persistence. 2. I take breaks. I know that sounds contradictory, but they work together. Sometimes, after I finish a painting or a series that I am really happy about, it’s hard for me to move on. I feel lost, but I force myself to pick up a brush or pencil even if I am not feeling creative. I will make myself start a new study or sketch, anything to keep it moving. At the same time, I also think it is crucial to take breaks. Whether it is taking a break from painting and spending the afternoon just sitting in the studio and thinking instead or stepping out of the studio for the day to visit galleries or go to the Met, it is important to allow yourself a moment to take a breath. Sometimes, taking a day off to step away from art entirely – like a trip to the beach or a day of shopping – can do wonders for a creative spirit!

11. You eat food? What kind? Like to cook?

I love food! I am a vegetarian, and I love trying all of the great, veg-friendly restaurants NYC has to offer. I also love to cook. Right now, my two favorite dishes to make are a pasta with kale and veggie sausage in a lemon olive oil garlic sauce, and a fresh salad with sautéed tempeh bacon, avocado, and tomato – yum!

12. Truth or Dare? Elaborate.

In terms of art, both. I always try to remain true to myself in my work while always daring myself to try the things that I am afraid I can’t do, to move forward, and try harder.

13. What is your most prized possession?

My husband. 🙂

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