Fresh Friday Finds: Alison Jardine

Contemporary visual artist Alison Jardine is today’s Fresh Friday Finds. This Dallas based artist, originally from Yorkshire, England, finds inspiration in nature and is an Artist-in-Residence at the Dallas Arboretum. Check out her gorgeous oil on canvas series, “Natural Abstractions,” here.

sunlight-silence-screenSunlight and Silence, 50″ x 50″ oil on canvas. © Alison Jardine

canopyofsunlightThe Pixel Tree: Sunlight Canopy, 36″ x 60″ oil on canvas. © Alison Jardine

Decypher-showimage-screenDecypher, 46″ x 46″ oil on canvas. © Alison Jardine

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Starry Night Before Dawn, 50″ x 50″ oil on canvas. © Alison Jardine

From AlisonJardine.com:

In these contemporary reinterpretations of the traditional genre of landscapes, I use colors, light and composition to explore my own sense of wilderness, the environment we live in, people in my life and my sense of self. In this series, I began using the idea of the ‘pixel’ as a ubiquitous intermediary between our society and nature, altering not only our aesthetic palettes, but also our understanding of our place in the  natural world.As the series progressed, I developed upon my idea of digital media as an intermediary during my process of creation, and the image distortion this introduces.

Hump Day Hot Seat: Tara Metzler

Fresh Friday Finds alum Tara Metzler is in today’s Hump Day Hot Seat on .stART here. Get to know this animal rights advocate and artist whose work you can find on pigdogonline.com as she answers some questions provided by Finch & Ada. Thanks for chilling in the Hot Seat, Tara!

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Photo courtesy of Tara Metzler © Megan Khichi Photography

1. Who Are You?

I am a tiny, fun and feisty individual who goes by the name of Tara

2. What do you do?

I do lots of things but my job by day is Graphic Designer and on nights and weekends I like to draw and paint for my side project, Pigdog, amongst many other things.

3. When/Where/How did you get your start?

I have always been a creative person or into creative things. Outside of school and work I would always draw little characters that people seemed to love but I had never done anything with them. After rescuing my Pit Bull, Novia, and having multiple bad jobs I decided to go for it and started Pigdog (named after said Pit Bull). It’s basically a portfolio of my artwork with the option to purchase. A percentage of all sales go to a local animal organization. I never wanted to have your typical 9 to 5 job forever and although I still have one, I am now pursuing something that I have always loved to do with a cause that I am passionate about…helping homeless animals and animal rights. I really need to thank my family, friends, and boyfriend for supporting me and pushing me to do what I love.

4. How long have you been at it?

Pigdog has been a thought in my head for quite some time but did not officially start until 2007 when I did my first Hoboken Art & Music Fest. There have been a lot of bumps in the road and lessons learned since then but I am happy to say that I stuck to it.

5. What is the most important thing we should know about you?

I am a lover of all animals and will kick your ass if you hurt them.

6. Is there anyone else in your field that you particularly admire?

I admire anyone that has the drive and passion to do what they love rather than settling.

7. What other types of art are you in to?

I love art done by children. Illustrator Dave DeVries did a book called The Monster Engine. He took children’s illustrations and painted them. It’s absolutely fantastic! I am also a big fan of photography, Edward Gorey, and Jean-Michel Basquiat. I like gritty, dark and cute. I am not drawn to perfection.

8. You got any crazy hobbies or unique talents?

I have lots of hobbies but, no, none that I would call crazy.

9. What’s your favorite vice?

Macaroni and cheese. If you know of any great recipes or restaurants that have it on the menu email me. 🙂

10. How do you make it over the creative hump?

Wine…just kidding…sort of. I can’t say I have ever been on a creative hump when it comes to my personal stuff. My brain is always in fast forward and coming up with whacky ideas. I write those ideas down and come back to them when I have the time and am ready to move onto the next project. The problem is there is never enough time to get to all of those ideas. Maybe my creative hump is my full time job?

11. You eat food? What kind? Like to cook?

Of course I eat food!!! Indian food, by far, is my favorite. My mouth waters any time I go into an Indian restaurant. I absolutely love to cook but hate to clean up the mess afterwards. It’s an ongoing battle.

12. If someone was to write a craigslist missed connection about you, what would it say?

Blonde haired girl with large sunglasses driving a very dirty Nissan Versa, I saw you sitting in traffic on the GSP completely oblivious to my honking.

13. What is your most prized possession?

I would say my dog, Stella, but it doesn’t sound right calling her a possession. I have many little sentimental things that I have held onto over the years but I would have to say a teddy bear my great Uncle gave me for my seventh birthday is my most prized possession.

Don’t miss Tara and her pit bull, Stella, at the Annual Hoboken Arts & Music Fest on May 5th where she’ll be selling her original artwork, prints, NEW! Pigdog branded notepads and more.

Monday Funday: James Austin Murray’s “Ides of March” at St. Peter’s Church

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Photo © Bernadette Cruz

A couple weeks ago, my coworker David invited a few of us to the opening reception for “Ides of March” by New York City based artist James Austin Murray at the Narthex Gallery of St. Peter’s Church on Lexington and 54th Street. I took some photographs of Murray’s large scale oil on canvas works, which I later found out were specifically created for the space. His technique and application really reminded me of vinyl records.

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Tamesis I and II, oil on canvas, 82″ x 128″ x 4″. Photo © Bernadette Cruz

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Bomb Proof Anchor, oil on canvas, 52″ x 110″ x 4″. Detail photo © Bernadette Cruz

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Bomb Proof Anchor, oil on canvas, 52″ x 110″ x 4″. Detail photo © Bernadette Cruz

For more about James Austin Murray’s work, visit http://jamesaustinmurray.com/. “Ides of March” is on display at the Narthex Gallery of St. Peter’s Church, 619 Lexington Ave. NYC, through April 25.

From James Austin Murray:

The color black, the subject of my painting, is all absorbing. It’s the hungriest of colors sucking all the visible spectrum into itself. The benefit of black is not only that it’s so deep, but the fact that paint is a pigment suspended in a binder. In oil pure black paint, absorbs the light spectrum and is also reflective. To me these paintings are not about the dark, as some have wondered aloud. They are about the light they reflect. I find them full of light and strangely bright for being black paintings. It is their blackness that make the reflections so much more effective. They reflect the colors around them, because of this each one feels like a new painting when placed in a different setting. All paintings reflect light, most reflect the spectrum of the colors in the paints. My current work is about painting and the paint. Are they also sculptures? No. They are paintings. If they were sculptures they would be sculptures about painting.

Sunday Funday: Allison Green’s “Entwined” at Susan Eley Fine Art

By Bernadette Cruz

Ladies & gentlemen, welcome to the first Sunday Funday post on .stART here. where I will be featuring fun exhibitions, shows, and cultural events. You can also find a nifty schedule of some sweet events from time to time too. Enjoy!

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Susan Eley Fine Art gallery. Photo courtesy of Allison Green

You might remember Allison Green and her work from an Artist You Should Know feature I wrote for Finch & Ada in February 2011 when I visited her Jersey City studio. At the time, Green was working on pieces for her upcoming solo show. In October, I revisited the very works I saw in progress at Green’s studio, which were now on display at the charming, salon-style Upper West Side art gallery Susan Eley Fine Art in New York City. I was lucky enough to privately view the solo exhibition, “Entwined,” joined by the artist herself.

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Light Violet Thicket. oil on canvas. 12” x 48”. Photo © Bernadette Cruz

The first thought that came to me upon walking through the doors of Susan Eley Fine Art is how fitting it is for Green’s large scale oil paintings to adorn the exposed brick walls, just as the subject matter is mostly found in the crevices and cracked pavement of the artist’s real-life urban neighborhood. Green says, “the most resilient and unexpectedly beautiful plants that exist in the urban landscape are plants that we normally consider weeds.”

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Detailed Sienna Thicket. oil on canvas. 48” x 48”. Photo © Bernadette Cruz

New York-based art critic and independent curator Lilly Wei says Green “extracts her botanicals from their contexts and deftly paints them close-up or in more wide-angled view.” With this technique, Green details the complex and intricate make up of living things, like in Queen Anne’s Lace and Buckhorn Plantains from The Healing Garden series, centered on bright, colorful backgrounds.  Within the webbed layers seen in works like Deep Violet Thicket and Sage Thicket from The Thicket series, Green personifies life experience and reminds the viewer of time and space.

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Artist Allison Green with her dog, Lila. Photo courtesy of Allison Green

Allison Green continues to paint at her home studio in Jersey City, NJ and is represented by Susan Eley Fine Art in New York City. With Susan Eley Fine Art, three of Green’s pieces were also on display at Aqua Art during Art Basel in Miami this year. Check out http://allisongreen.net/ for more information.

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Allison Green’s studio. Photo courtesy of Allison Green

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