Hump Day Hot Seat: Dan Puleo

Ladies & gentlemen, welcome to the first Hump Day Hot Seat post on .stART here. where you’ll get to know some cool artists a little bit better.  I will be asking questions provided by Finch & Ada.  Enjoy!

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1. Who are you?

Dan Puleo, sometimes Daniel Jack. It depends on the weather.

2. What do you do?

Right now, I am working for a mid-century modern art/furniture gallery in West Palm Beach, Florida. It is really helping me research and develop some exciting new ventures I have planned, furniture design and simple framed works on paper. Unlike New York City and New Jersey, the market down here is less cluttered. I think it could be a fresh new market for me… if they’re even read for it. I also create mixed media paintings. I was using found objects on canvas, but I am refining and using gallery wrap canvas and works on paper. I think it’s time for marketability.

3. When/Where/How did you get your start?

I was raised in New Jersey so I guess you can say I got my start there. I think my 4th grade teacher told me I was talented when I won a poster contest for fire prevention. When I moved to New York City is when I started garnering some attention from other artists and collectors. I lived Uptown so I took the train a lot. I would notice the difference in the maintenance of each train station I stopped at. I really liked the way advertisements were peeled off and tagged. I remember seeing faint images of fashion models underneath gyro posters underneath Newport ads underneath a flyer for a local show underneath…you get the idea, lots of layers. My dad is somewhat responsible for my love of street art. He drove a truck that was pretty accessible to great graffiti artists in Paterson, New Jersey. He liked to show my brother and me new pieces whenever someone tagged the truck. But, my dad didn’t like it too much when I got in trouble for vandalism in high school. My brother, Bobby, also exposed me to the latest skate videos and punk rock pretty young so that was a plus. Skateboarding culture played a huge role in my life and has influenced my art greatly.

4. How long have you been at it?

I was to say too long, but I guess it hasn’t been long enough.

5. What is the most important thing we should know about you?

I’m usually my biggest critic when it comes to my art. It still surprises me when someone really loves a piece that I thought was just whatever. I like to disconnect from the piece when I feel it’s done, kind of put it away from me and then go back later and see how I feel. I don’t like to become attached to pieces of art, most of them started as garbage and most of them will end up as garbage.

6. Is there anyone else in your field that you particularly admire?

I admire anyone who can make a living following their passion when it come to art. I also admire people who starve just to hold on to their passion for art. That being said, I admire most artists. Robert Rauschenberg is one of my favorite artists. He recently died, and I think he may be buried here in West Palm.

7. What other types of art are you into?
Anything lowbrow, street art, pop art, signage, and furniture design.
8. You got any crazy hobbies or unique talents?
My skull collection is growing. I just found a goat skull and a pig skull in the same garden. Voodoo?
9. What’s your favorite vice?
Miami
10. How do you make it over the creative hump?
Right now, I am at the top of the hump about to roll back down the other side. Changing location and lifestyle over the past year has been interesting. I am kind of surveying the scene down here and waiting for the right moment to release some real art. There is definitely some money to be made in South Florida, hopefully this old money wants some new art.
11. You eat food? What kind? Like to cook?
I do like food. I eat out a lot. I did just recently get a blender for Christmas. I want to drink most of my food from now on.
12. Truth or Dare? Elaborate.
Truth. I’ve admitted most things already so it shouldn’t be too hard.
13. What is your most prized posession?
I already mentioned my skull collection so I would have to say my vintage camera collection.
Check out Dan’s online portfolio for more information. Photo courtesy of Dan Puleo.
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Sunday Funday: Allison Green’s “Entwined” at Susan Eley Fine Art

By Bernadette Cruz

Ladies & gentlemen, welcome to the first Sunday Funday post on .stART here. where I will be featuring fun exhibitions, shows, and cultural events. You can also find a nifty schedule of some sweet events from time to time too. Enjoy!

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Susan Eley Fine Art gallery. Photo courtesy of Allison Green

You might remember Allison Green and her work from an Artist You Should Know feature I wrote for Finch & Ada in February 2011 when I visited her Jersey City studio. At the time, Green was working on pieces for her upcoming solo show. In October, I revisited the very works I saw in progress at Green’s studio, which were now on display at the charming, salon-style Upper West Side art gallery Susan Eley Fine Art in New York City. I was lucky enough to privately view the solo exhibition, “Entwined,” joined by the artist herself.

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Light Violet Thicket. oil on canvas. 12” x 48”. Photo © Bernadette Cruz

The first thought that came to me upon walking through the doors of Susan Eley Fine Art is how fitting it is for Green’s large scale oil paintings to adorn the exposed brick walls, just as the subject matter is mostly found in the crevices and cracked pavement of the artist’s real-life urban neighborhood. Green says, “the most resilient and unexpectedly beautiful plants that exist in the urban landscape are plants that we normally consider weeds.”

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Detailed Sienna Thicket. oil on canvas. 48” x 48”. Photo © Bernadette Cruz

New York-based art critic and independent curator Lilly Wei says Green “extracts her botanicals from their contexts and deftly paints them close-up or in more wide-angled view.” With this technique, Green details the complex and intricate make up of living things, like in Queen Anne’s Lace and Buckhorn Plantains from The Healing Garden series, centered on bright, colorful backgrounds.  Within the webbed layers seen in works like Deep Violet Thicket and Sage Thicket from The Thicket series, Green personifies life experience and reminds the viewer of time and space.

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Artist Allison Green with her dog, Lila. Photo courtesy of Allison Green

Allison Green continues to paint at her home studio in Jersey City, NJ and is represented by Susan Eley Fine Art in New York City. With Susan Eley Fine Art, three of Green’s pieces were also on display at Aqua Art during Art Basel in Miami this year. Check out http://allisongreen.net/ for more information.

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Allison Green’s studio. Photo courtesy of Allison Green

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