Hump Day Hot Seat: James Austin Murray

 

James

©Max Noy Photo

1. Who are you? 

My name is James Austin Murray. I used to go by Jim Murray, but if you Google “Jim Murray artist,” good luck finding me. Now I go by my full name.

2. What do you do? 

I build and make paintings, what I mean by build them is I make the solid substrates they’re on and shape them as a starting place for the painting.

3. When/Where/How did you get your start? 

I’ve been making art of some sort since high school. I studied Illustration at Parsons School of Design, and I spent a long time doing work that was in some ways illustrative, but now my work has become completely abstract. I find it so much more engaging and the work evolves differently than figurative work.

4. How long have you been at it? 

See above.

5. Is there anyone else in your field that you particularly admire?  

Richard Serra for his ability to do massive powerful works that have magic. I also admire many artists who’s names are not yet household names. A few of those are Diane Scott, Keiko Narahashi, Mark Zimmermann, Alex Couwenberg, Valerie Brennan, Susan Carr, Erika Diehl, Don Voisine and lots of other living, hard working artists. There are so many excellent artists working today.

6. What other types of art are you in to?  

I’m pretty impressed by all artists and artisans, particularly by people who believe in what they do and have found a way to do it life long. I have huge respect for the artist that never gets to show much and works their entire life. To me it shows that they are or were true believers in their artistic endeavor.

7. You got any crazy hobbies or unique talents?  

I collect art, it’s not so much a hobby as it is a love. I think it’s important for an artist to understand what motivates a collector and there is no better way of doing that than collecting. It’s also becoming a retirement account. I don’t know about stocks, but art I know what I fall in love with. Yet it’s something I hope never to have to sell. Lots of people think that collecting art is exclusively for the rich. I spend an average of maybe $1000 a year, that’s less than someone spends if they smoke two packs of cigarettes per week.

8. What’s your favorite vice? 

Lust and Italian wine!

9. How do you make it over the creative hump?  

I can’t relate to artistic block anymore. I have a daily studio practice, and it’s about getting work done. There’s always busy work I can do if I’m not feeling “on” so that when I am feeling clear headed and ready to rock, my studio is ready for me.

10. You eat food? What kind? Like to cook?  

I would eat Japanese every day if I could afford it. I’m a decent cook. I learned initially from my friend June Chung who taught me how to cook Italian food in France. He had lived in Italy when he was learning to sing Opera.

11. What is your most prized possession? 

I think it has to be my workspace. I could loose everything and be OK if I could continue to have a space to make work. It’s my personal rabbit hole and my playroom.

 

 

 

 

Fresh Friday Finds: Alison Jardine

Contemporary visual artist Alison Jardine is today’s Fresh Friday Finds. This Dallas based artist, originally from Yorkshire, England, finds inspiration in nature and is an Artist-in-Residence at the Dallas Arboretum. Check out her gorgeous oil on canvas series, “Natural Abstractions,” here.

sunlight-silence-screenSunlight and Silence, 50″ x 50″ oil on canvas. © Alison Jardine

canopyofsunlightThe Pixel Tree: Sunlight Canopy, 36″ x 60″ oil on canvas. © Alison Jardine

Decypher-showimage-screenDecypher, 46″ x 46″ oil on canvas. © Alison Jardine

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Starry Night Before Dawn, 50″ x 50″ oil on canvas. © Alison Jardine

From AlisonJardine.com:

In these contemporary reinterpretations of the traditional genre of landscapes, I use colors, light and composition to explore my own sense of wilderness, the environment we live in, people in my life and my sense of self. In this series, I began using the idea of the ‘pixel’ as a ubiquitous intermediary between our society and nature, altering not only our aesthetic palettes, but also our understanding of our place in the  natural world.As the series progressed, I developed upon my idea of digital media as an intermediary during my process of creation, and the image distortion this introduces.